Cancer Screening and Prevention

For the greater population in the WWAMI region, Alaska and Wyoming have among the lowest rates nationally, while Idaho and Wyoming are two WWAMI states with the lowest mortality rates due to cancer (CDC). Cancer mortality and incidence is related to socioeconomic position. Breast cancer mortality rate is lower for Latinas than other groups. There is also a lower rate of cervical cancer among Latinas. Cancer screening is mediated by low income, low education level, lack of a usual source of care, lack of knowledge about testing, and living in a rural area (WA State DOH).

PARTICIPANT VIEWS ON CURRENT STATE OF CANCER SCREENING AND PREVENTION:

  • Latinos are less likely to get screened for cancer
  • A lot of stigma regarding cancer
  • Often too late once getting diagnosis
  • Higher rates of acute mylogenous leukemia
  • More people are getting screened for colon cancer due to concerted efforts
  • Higher rates of stomach cancer
  • Higher rates of cervical cancer
     

PARTICIPANTS NOTED BARRIERS TO RECEIVING SCREENING AND PREVENTION SERVICES:

  • There is not enough information about services and providers; people don’t know how to follow up, and everything is in English
  • Barriers in communication and translation of materials is often poor
  • People don’t know how screening services are paid for
  • There is a lack of data collection to see who is getting screening and prevention services
  • Difficult to find data specific to different population types — migrant workers, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, etc.
  • There is a real need for outreach to encourage people to get services
  • There are funding issues and a lack of resources
  • Tendency to do helicopter research and not leave anything behind for the participants or the community
  • Undocumented care remains an issue; not getting preventive services
  • There is resistance from providers to use interpreters
  • Information gaps in health; people may not understand when preventive services are needed
     

SOME RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES AND PARTNERSHIPS AS NOTED BY PARTICIPANTS:

  • Children’s hospital project trained people as patient navigators
  • Project Comadre a Comadre found to be very successful
  • Understand how to get men involved in their health care and in for screenings
  • Understand how to educate children to encourage screening
  • What type of marketing work is needed to get people screened?
  • Studies that look at using cell phone technology to get people into appointments
  • Partner with agencies to ask what they want to do; what do they see as the needs of the community?
  • New global initiative is comparing to other countries; how is the U.S. doing in terms of screening and prevention compared to others?

Contact Information | Latino Center for Health | ginoa@uw.edu | lsm2010@uw.edu | 206-616-9365